You Don’t Understand Mary Kay!

Written by TRACY on . Posted in Pink Truth Critics

A note from a Mary Kay consultant who says we just don’t understand Mary Kay. Use the comments section to set her straight, ladies.

I’ve been in MK for 15 years and it’s been a very positive and totally enriching experience for me and my family as a single mom.  It’s just too bad that you obviously have nothing better to do than send negativity out into the universe.  With all that negativity going out there you will get it back.  It’s called the Law of Cause and Effect, you’re making the cause and will get the effect.

I think your intent may be to help others but there is no secret to all that you’ve written.  The marketing plan isn’t a pyramid because team building is a choice.  Mary Kay Ash designed this business so that if all you wanted to do is make money from sales, you definitely could.  It eliminates all the problems that come from consultants and directors from money problems. 
Front-loading on product?  You obviously don’t understand the concept of being your own retailer and providing immediate customer service to your customers.  I’ve done it both ways by choice and spent too much time, energy and gas placing orders and setting up deliveries, then delivering product.  When you tear apart the scripts, you’re tearing apart Mary Kay Ash’s own words of how to work in direct sales before she even created the company. 
You know, Mary Kay, Inc. has no control over the few who have used this business for advancement using non-MK principles and have obviously somehow hurt or burned some people’s feelings, like yours.  Neither do they have control over those like you, who trash the good that has come from this business. 
It’s sad that you feel so strongly a need to use your time to perpetuating this negativity.  Then use this same negativity to prosper from it by selling anti-MK paraphernalia.  Post this comment, won’t you?  That would be being honest.  Give a fair view of the whole picture.

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Comments (43)

  • Cheryl Mehrer

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    Obviously she hasn’t risen very high up the career path …

    Reply

  • PinkHaze

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    Gosh – there’s so much denial here it’s hard to know where to start. How about this quote:

    “When you tear apart the scripts, you’re tearing apart Mary Kay Ash’s own words of how to work in direct sales before she even created the company.”

    Unlike those deep in the pink fog, we don’t all idolize Mary Kay Ash as a saint. We see her as a successful but flawed woman who built a business with tactics and strategies that promoted recognition over income, cheer leading instead of training and contests rather than a fair compensation model.

    Additionally, if you think that what worked 50 years ago still works today – and is never in need of update, then you don’t understand general business principles at all. Mary Kay Ash would be horrified to know that you can’t understand how to alter your “scripts” to properly manipulate today’s woman.

    Shame on you.

    Reply

    • Lisa

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      “Unlike those deep in the pink fog, we don’t all idolize Mary Kay Ash as a saint.” Say it sister!

      Reply

  • MLM Radar

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    Schedule C please? Or do you have someone else prepare your tax return so you can ignore the ugly truth?

    Oh you might make a few dollars simply selling product, if you don’t count the cost of “investing” in inventory that sits on your shelf gathering dust until it is discontinued.

    In Mary Kay, purchasing inventory when you don’t have customer pre-orders, just because it is HOT! NEW! Limited Edition!, is called an “investment”.

    Anywhere outside of Direct Sales the same decision is called High Risk Speculation, as in “high risk of losing every dime you spent.”

    Reply

  • raisinberry

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    You may be enjoying a part time sales consultant relationship with customers that gives you pin money. If that is all you know first hand, then you really don’t have any real understanding of what we are talking about. It is never “negative” to expose the underbelly of a beast.

    There were enjoyable experiences in Mary Kay for all of us, but at what cost? Over 15 years, I saw 2 women consistently sell product…at least claim to. What I saw MOST, was growing personal debt, denial of stockpiled merchandise, pretense on earnings, manipulation to order when not necessary, or to win benchmarks, and a corporation that PRETENDED its sales force was flourishing. The PRESIDENT of the company, back in 2003-4 said the average number of skin care classes held in the US, per consultant, per month was…ONE.

    So who are you kidding?

    Reply

  • mlank64

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    “Front-loading on product? You obviously don’t understand the concept of being your own retailer and providing immediate customer service to your customers”

    Frontloading is the essence of the this business. If you took away the frontloading….everyting will tumble down in a big ole pile of dog poo poo. It is the frontloading that is encouraged from the tippy top of the pyramid scheme. Go ask Mr. Gloria Mayfield Banks…”can I get another 1200 dollar older”. You’ve been duped for 15 years…probably barely making minimum wage.

    Here’s a question…If everything has been so positive and enriching, why are you here on this “negative site”. Shouldn’t you be focusing on your IPAs?

    Reply

  • antique rose

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    Darlin’ if we don’t understand Mary Kay, why are there over
    ten thousand of us Pink Truth Members, plus all the lurkers
    on this site? Numbers don’t lie. However, NSDs and
    Directors and Corpse do. Let’s see your Schedule C.
    Go on, I dare you to print it for us. And by the way, dearie,
    WHY ARE YOU READING THIS SITE?

    Reply

  • BestDecision

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    As someone who was a Director trying to steer my own unit away from bloggers when this site was born and now as a former Director that voluntarily sent my Cadillac back and resigned from my position, I can understand why you might think everything about this site is negative. Unfortunately, that’s not accurate at all.

    Frankly, the numbers never lie. And, they still don’t. Out of all the hundreds of Consultants that I had in my unit over the years, very few ever truly made money. While we gross profitted 50%, you can’t forget that you’ll have to pay federal and state tax on that profit and then subtract all the expenses it cost you to maintain that business for the year. READ THIS CLEARLY: I personally did not turn a net profit until I debuted as a Director. Not a dime.

    Sadly, less than 2% of the Top 2% (Directors) in the entire company are driving Cadillacs, which means all the other Directors aren’t grossing more than $3,000/month. With Directorship comes lots of other expenses that Consultants don’t have, such as meeting room rent, copying newsletters, postage, phone line(s), Leadership Conference travel, Director suits, etc. (Side note: Chargebacks are ridiculous and traumatic to a Director’s income!) A Premier Club Director, which is more than that top 2% tier but still not the majority of Directors, would only be grossing $2,000/month in commissions.

    In New Director Week, we were taught to use the profit from our personal sales to run our business and leave our commissions as our paychecks to our personal account. I’ve done it, but it wasn’t easy. Nor did it happen perfectly every month. Airfare KILLED my profits, for example.

    So, be careful to know the facts and try hard to read through the, admittedly, tough emotions that are voiced on this site and all the other sites out there. There are a lot of frustrated, let down people, and I can say from personal experience that I’ve seen them get that way because they didn’t ignore the truth of net profit vs. gross profit. The looked at the truth in the eye and were disappointed that they had very little chance at ever making it that big in the company.

    (Sigh)

    Reply

    • Guest

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      Just passing through and gathering information: what are chargebacks?

      Also, what does Director In Qualification mean? Is that a level of Directorship or something? What is being qualified?

      Reply

      • exibc78

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        A chargeback is when product is returned by a consultant to May Kay the upline (recruiter and all sales directors up the line to NSD) get their commissions they received on that product deducted from their commission check.
        Director in Qualification or DIQ means you have enough consultants to qualify to be a director. I think you need 10 recruits. Then you have 3 months to get the minimum # of recruits (I think it is 40, but I know someone will correct me) and a certain amount of wholesale orders (with the increase this month someone please tell me what this is).
        Now here is the dark evilness…if you don’t make it, then you unit you have been working on gets split up. If they are your personal recruit, you personally signed them up, you get to keep them. If THEY recruit anyone, then those recruits go to your sales director. Example…My sister was recruited into MK. This put her recruiter into DIQ. I decided to sign up and I wanted to be my sisters recruit. Unfortunately if her recruiter didn’t make it then I would have gone to her SD unit and my sister would have stayed with her recruiters unit. So instead of being my sisters recruit I was then her recruiters recruit so no matter what we wouldn’t be split up. Does that make sense?

        Reply

        • MK Taints the Color Pink

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          They can take up to 4 months to finish the qualification period. They need 24 active consultants (including themselves) by the end of the qualification period. The production is the same despite recent increases in maintenance requirements for sales directors. DIQ must have a unit production of $18,000 WHOLESALE (with no more that $4,000 of personal contribution).

          You can learn more about the different levels from the Advance Brochure. Note that there were increases in two areas starting March 1, 2014, which are not reflected in the 2013 brochure.
          (1) For an IBC to maintain active status and keep the 50% “earned discount privilege” for the month ordered and the following 2 months, they must now order $225 wholesale of SECTION 1 products in one order. Example: IBC orders $225 wholesale on March 27, 2014; IBC remains active until May 31, 2014.
          (2) Directors now have a maintenance requirement of at least $4,500 wholesale unit production per month.
          Copy and paste the following into your browser and remove the space after “dropbox” http://www.dropbox .com/s/veilftzna7i8wog/AdvanceBrochure2013.pdf

          Reply

        • princess lea

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          To expand a little on your reply exibc78, and to help Guest with more info, I will add that chargebacks dont always come out of your commissions. Sometimes you get to write MK corporate a nice little check. When I was starting out I had a few recruits who returned product. I wasn’t getting any commission from other team members, so I had to directly pay MK back for the commission they had given me. Commission checks are kinda like found money. Chargebacks that you have to cover yourself are kinda like a surprise bill that you forgot to pay and then it comes back to haunt you. You can actually lose your IBC status over it :(
          Also, it is correct that if the DIQ doesn’t finish in 4 months, the team members will be split up. But one other thing ‘they’ don’t tell you is that anybody you personally recruited before your recruiter went into DIQ will NOT be in the new unit. They will stay with the Sr. Director. I lost two team members that way! They were so disappointed at not being part of the same unit I was in that they quit. Whatever excuse you need, I guess. But it is still a harsh reality that your recruits can and will be split up in different units, no matter what.

          Reply

  • Kate

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    You can tell how deep she’s in the pink fog by this quote:

    “When you tear apart the scripts, you’re tearing apart Mary Kay Ash’s own words of how to work in direct sales before she even created the company. ”

    What’s wrong with tearing apart someone’s ~~own words~~ when those words are based on deceit and lies? Believe what you want about MKA, but perfect she is not.

    Reply

  • princess lea

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    I was a consultant for 9 years. I worked my business very consistently, and some of the time I had fun! I lied to myself the rest of the time.
    cancellation after cancellation after cancellation… returned inventory, returned starter kit. team members starting but never ordering. A failed attempt at car and DIQ. What ever happened to my team?
    It was a harsh realization that I was stuck making nothing because I wasnt part of the elusive big girl club. and to rub salt in my wound, I also learned that I can not count on anyone to make me successful. people are undependable.
    it is a lie that you can make money in MK even if you dont recruit!
    I never once turned a profit, even though my accountant bought product from me.
    Somebody here on Pink Truth helped me figure out why it seemed like I was making money, it was because I was selling product so I had a steady flow, or turnaround of products, if you will.
    guilt is a very strong factor in this business. if your unit doesnt meet a goal, it is your fault! you didnt try hard enough.
    I had a consultant friend who started simply to help out a relative. Her husband was dying of cancer. She needed friendship, not guilt, not debt. what she got instead was $3,600.00 worth of products (again, to help her relative) that she would never be able to sell. I felt so sorry for her. what a sad situation to be in. but at the time I was in the pink fog and was convinced that she was being negative. She just had to try harder. Really?

    Reply

    • princess lea

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      I feel as though I should reply to my comment and make a clarification. I did not mean to imply that being in the big girl club (directorship) will make a consultant more money. It wont. You will have to work twice as hard, and have four times the amount of expenses.
      So, not only are you still stuck making nothing as a director, you could very possibly be digging yourself deeper into debt as you have to carry a monthly payment on the car, plus order copious amounts of inventory to meet the monthly unit minimum production quotas when your unit doesn’t produce. Wait – I thought Mary Kay had no quotas??? Oh… looks like one more lie to add to the list. I am so thankful I got out before I learned that lesson firsthand!!!

      Reply

  • imewise

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    Even if you avoid recruiting and simply sell, keeping an inventory to serve the immediate needs of your customers (few, rare orders.) The company sticks it to you by the ON PURPOSE constant product changes/ packaging updates. They know that you are encouraged to have an inventory that is up to date to keep your customers happy. They know that there is peer pressure to order the new to “take a leap of faith and take your business seriously”. The company times out product changes specifically to keep you ordering to keep up. If you read “just the facts” it says that products are changed approximately every 5 years. That is incorrect, packaging changes more often than that, one or two components of a set can be reformulated or “updated” etc. If you research here “timewise product changes” “satin hands changes” and “lip gloss” you will find dated changes to see just how many times you can expect to re stock the new things… thinking FINALLY you will have enough updated product… only for them to change something else that was working. Party with a purpose was done to energize consultants to hold parties, the company had a wakeup call when they realized that they fell very short of their goal of 5 million parties by the 50th anniversary. If they don’t get you in the recruiting pyramid and the constant wheel to keep up with team production goals by constantly telling you that you are on target for something, then they will get the “honest just going to sell part time” consultants with the product changes. Maybelline had kept the same green and pink mascara tube for decades. Truth is, customers WANT the company to stop changing everything. (after 15 years you should know… eliminating classic basic, compact changes, foundation changes, satin hands turning peach temporarily, etc)

    Reply

  • Imewise

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    I was in for 10 years, I was a director.
    Even if they don’t get you trapped in the recruiting pyramid, you will get trapped in keeping up with inventory due to the constant product changes. The truth is, the company knows that you have immense pressure to keep your inventory up to date … take a leap of faith and prove you re serious about your business… take god as your business partner etc. The company lies on “just the facts” where they say that they make product changes every 5 years to keep up with the times. If you search here for articles on timewise changes, satin hands changes, and lipstick changes.. you will see that you can expect AT LEAST a package change, if not a component of the sets being reformulated within a year. Do you remember the satin hands was once 5 steps, then 3, then peach, then not peach, then new packaging, etc etc.. In for 15 years you will remember satin hands and body, hand and decolette cream, tereme de sola, private spa, then that wreched green tea and bamboo (smelled like hair spray) crap. We could go on memory lane. Customers prefer the product to stay the same, Maybelline has kept the classic pink and green mascara tube. Chanel has not changed its classic black quilted look with the interlocking cc. Mk signature was a joke. You can try to be a good consultant and stay clear of recruiting, but you will always be on target to get a trinket and order more, or revamp due to product change.

    Reply

  • Jen G.

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    Gee, and I thought I was being positive by coming on here just to tell everyone, “Merry Christmas!”

    Reply

  • Pinkiu

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    “With all that negativity going out there you will get it back. It’s called the Law of Cause and Effect, you’re making the cause and will get the effect.”

    Now this is interesting. Is Mary Kay now teaching New Agism/Eastern Philosophy? Since when? I thought Mary Kay was all about Christianity and I know that this ‘Law of Attraction’ belief is in stark contrast to Christianity. Consider the apostles. They preached the gospel in places where they were then put to death. So tell me, how did the ’cause’ of their doing good by sharing their faith end up being such a bad ‘effect’? They were tortured. Regardless of the possible good that came of their persecution, it was personal to them and a bad ending for them. So be careful of sharing this philosophy, if you claim to be a Christian, since in reality it is the teaching of Karma.

    Reply

    • princess lea

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      AMEN!!!

      Reply

  • BarTheDoor

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    My friend who quit MK this year used to sound just like you. Anyone who was negative about Mary Kay wasn’t asked to become a consultant, but she still tried to sell the overpriced products to them. Her husband sat her down with their financial info and explained to her that she hadn’t made a dime in her entire time selling Mary Kay. She lost money every month she didn’t make enough to pay more than the minimum on her credit cards. When you factored in how much she was making after business expenses, she was hemorrhaging money. She worked nights, weekends, holidays, even overnight sometimes to get free samples packed up to send to people who bought a lipstick from her two years ago just so they would buy. It was sad to watch her trying so hard to sell something that no one wanted. People avoided her, would agree to host a party for her and then cancel a few days before, flat out told her they didn’t like Mary Kay products, even unfriended her on Facebook because her posts were always about Mary Kay. When I asked to see the financials for this opportunity she was trying to convince me was right for me, she had to admit she was making no money, but she was convinced that it was all her own fault. It wasn’t. You cannot sell something no one wants to buy, no matter how hard you try.

    Now she’s out and she still has a full room of products that she doesn’t know what to do with. The other consultants were told by her director not to swap or buy from her, and she is reluctant to send the products back because she doesn’t want to make anyone mad. She says she’s glad she’s out of it though. Even if she has to give the products to Goodwill, she’s got her life back.

    One day you’ll be like her and you’ll look back at this email and see how deep in the fog you were. I really pray that you will not be carrying more debt than you can pay like my friend is. I also pray that the reason you wrote to Pink Truth is because you have doubts and your letter was meant to convince yourself that what you were doing was worthwhile and right for your family. I think I see it there in between the lines.

    Reply

    • WhatSisterhood

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      “The other consultants were told by her director not to swap or buy from her”

      Wow, what a great way to promote sisterhood!

      Also, I was on ebay and saw tons of Mary Kay products being sold there, so she could try that.

      Reply

  • enorth

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    This reads like it might be from Jimmy Cundiff.

    Reply

  • Marie

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    These fog-laden defensive letters all sound the same. It’s uncanny how they can come from completely different areas and people, yet they are obviously products of the same brainwashing. There’s a sad defensiveness threaded through all of them — cloaked in anger or feigned pity for us here. And what is being defended? Sadly, it’s fear. Fear that this site, with its thousands of regulars and lurkers — whose stories are all the same — might just be victims and not losers after all.

    Reply

  • CaliforniaGal

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    Hi Gal friends. Yup! I was in Mary Kay to gain friends and have a fun time. Then I made the leap to being a director. By incredible personal effort and a good credit, I made it to the top 2% of Mary Kay. But then the real expenses flooded my business like a tidal wave. My unit, despite my hard work, didn’t last two years. But I stayed in 10 more years. My schedule C showed that some years I made a hundred dollars and some years I lost a hundred dollars. My expenses still ate me up.

    When I found Pink Truth, I realized I had dot quit. I wasn’t making any money and my mind was cluttered with Mary Kay all of the time. I am so glad I am out. What was the good? Well, I don’t hear from my old friends anymore. If a person wants to stay in Mary Kay, that’s fine. Just don’t try to convince me it’s an honest way to make a living. Ya just don’t make money equal to the effort put forth by the individual Mary Kay lady.

    Reply

  • Lisa

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    What if you are an independent consultant and don’t hold inventory? Don’t travel with the unit and only do home parties….am I going to make money? I have been a consultant for 7 months. It seems like I am making profit…I don’t recruit, I don’t have inventory, and I was top seller in my unit last quarter….Am I in a pink fog or one of the lucky ones?

    Reply

    • Pinkiu

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      First of all, I don’t fully believe that you don’t hold inventory nor hold parties. Why? You’ve already run through your family and friends and I doubt they are going to hold more parties for you out of pity purchases.

      Are you making any money? Well maybe a little, but certainly not as much as you’d make spending those hours at a job. The easiest thing is to add up all of your expenses, and you have them. If you don’t have inventory then you are having to probably pay full price to MK for some of those items when you need to place a $20 order. Big red flag here to me anyway that you are not being truthful. Even if you had inventory, there’s always someone wants that you don’t have. So how are you getting those $12 items without ordering $400 retail? You pay shipping and you have to buy supplies. Add that in. Next, lots of postage and gas. Are you discounting? There’s no way you are going to do business any more without lots of freebies and discounting. Remember, when you discount or give something away, you’ve eaten the sales tax. Have you had any open houses or made baskets or done anything involving the purchase of food or cutsie things to make products more desirable? Have you bought new clothes? I could go on and on.

      So now have you tracked every single minutes you’ve worked your business? Every time you text, call, FB or email with anything MK? How often do you go shopping and warm stalk women? How much time to prepare for a party and tear down and put away and deliver items and package those items? Every single minute

      You’ll find that, sure, you might make $75 in a week that’s profit but you worked 20 hours to get it. You’d make more at Burger King.

      Reply

    • cbbgreat

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      sorry, you were not the top “seller” – MK doesn’t track consultant sales to customers, they track consultant purchases from the company. And it may “seem” like you are making a profit but follow the advice of pinkiu and track time spent against every penny spent or lost (sales tax or discounted product) – then see how foggy you feel.

      Reply

    • MLM Radar

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      Lisa,

      For many years in my office we had an Avon lady. She made the current catalogs available to anyone who wanted to look, let us know that she ordered about every two weeks, and delivered our orders about a week later. She had a steady business, never stocked inventory, and never had anyone complain that they didn’t like having to wait.

      She made enough money to pay for lunch, but that was about all. If all you’re doing with Mary Kay is serving a modest but loyal customer base you’re probably earning about the same as she did: pocket change. Not enough to pay any bills or save for retirement.

      We have an excellent spreadsheet you can use to track your sales and expenses and figure out whether you’re making a profit. You will find it here:
      Want to Do a Reality Check on Your Mary Kay Business?
      http://www.pinktruth.com/2007/10/want-to-do-a-reality-check-on-your-mary-kay-business/

      There is one more thing you should track on that spreadsheet. You should track how many hours you spend working Mary Kay, then divide your Mary Kay profits (if any) by the number of hours you used to get those profits.

      To get an honest reality check you need to include ALL your Mary Kay hours: time spent collecting orders from customers, placing orders, receiving and unpacking orders, distributing orders, filling out paperwork, making phone calls, attending meetings, attending conferences and seminars, finding and approaching prospective customers, driving around on Mary Kay business, maintaining your website, placing ads on Facebook and elsewhere, placing and maintaining fishbowls, ordering supplies, assembling demonstration kits, cleaning and restocking used samples, organizing parties, setting up for parties, holding parties, cleaning up after parties, ordering catalogs and samples, affixing your name and contact information on the catalogs and samples, distributing catalogs and samples, reading and learning about Mary Kay product changes… In other words, if you spend time doing ANYTHING Mary Kay you need to track it.

      Then you will whether you are really making a profit, or whether it just seems like you are making a profit.

      Reply

    • Michelle

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      ” It seems like I am making profit…”

      This is like being “a little bit pregnant” – you either are, or you aren’t. The numbers tell the story and the numbers don’t lie. I see a lot of folks in my job (I’m a small business consultant) who don’t run their numbers because they don’t want to know the truth – that they are not, at the end of the day, making a profit (or many times, even coming close to breaking even). It’s really easy to mentally gloss over certain expenses, say “those don’t count” or “well, that isn’t REALLY a Mary Kay expense because of blah-blah.” When you are REALLY honest with yourself, and use a tool like the spreadsheet posted above (or, ideally, a program like Quickbooks), you will have a firm answer: yes, I am profitable. Or no, I am not. Success in ANY business is dependent on knowing and understanding your financial numbers. Without proof of financial performance, you can assume you are not profitable. IMO.

      Reply

  • Lisa

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    It shocks me how bitter you ladies are. I came here
    For advice from women who have been in my situation. Thank you MLM Radar. Your response is exactly what I was hoping for.
    Just to clear up some things
    I don’t have inventory but I do do parties. I place a MK order once a week to fulfill the previous weeks orders. My director has stock and loans to me if someone needs something urgent. I have done no parties with family. It seems like I am making a profit was what I am looking at without all the little extra trackings.
    Merry Christmas. I hope 2014 brings all of you nothing but happiness! It seems like a lot of you need it’

    Reply

    • BestDecision

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      Lisa, you have been given good advice on seeking the real numbers and determining if you actually are 1) turning a profit and 2) how much you’re worth per hour you invest in your business. Attitudes & emotions aside, it is good advice and the same things I did with my own business and taught to my Consultants as their Director.

      I do want to point out, treating you just as I’d want to be treated, that your director is violating her Consultant AND Director Agreement by loaning you products. That creates a distributorship, which negates Mary Kay’s dual-level marketing plan. In fact, both your Director and you are in violation and can lose your businesses by corporate should they find out. And, believe me, they do. Their legal department is ferocious and actually one of the best parts of MK Corp.

      My advice: Run the numbers without placing emotion into the equation and see what your business is with and what you’re worth running it like you currently do. It helped me, and it was always an eye-opener for my unit members that said the yep wanted more but weren’t doing enough to get it there.

      Merry Christmas!

      Reply

    • Notinmknomo

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      It’s not bitterness. You just don’t like the answer’s you’ve been given. They are the straight forward truth from our own experiences, not sugar coated.

      Now, think about this. You may only want to make a few extra bucks. For example, $50 a week. But do you really want to spend 30 hours a week trying to do that? That’s why you need to do the “extra tracking.”

      Despite that, anytime you are working with money, tracking all the little things is important. Even your home budget. So many people don’t know where there money went. They just have no idea how the little things add up, and never will if they don’t track.

      Reply

    • princess lea

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      “It seems like I am making a profit”
      pocket change is not making profit!
      I busted my tail for 9 years and all I ever had was mocha money.

      Reply

    • Lazy Gardens

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      It seems like I am making a profit was what I am looking at without all the little extra trackings.

      Add up ALL your income from Mary Kay product sales … the actual money in, after any discounts, etc. This is gross income.

      Add up ALL your expenses: shipping costs, website, car use for delivery, samples, business cards, look books, special clothing, hostess gifts … any expense you would not have if you didn’t sell Mary Kay.

      Subtract expenses from income …. that’s the bottom line. This is “net” income.

      Now, if your income exceeds your expenses, add up all the hours you have spent selling, delivering, and taking care of buisness details like ordering. Include meetings, phone calls to your director, and the time it takes to borrow product.

      Divide the net income by the number of hours it took to get that income … compare that income per hour to your other possible uses of that time. Is it worth it?

      Reply

  • Marie

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    Lisa, people who are sold a lie get bitter. That’s a universal truth of humanity. Period. They’ve given you clear, concrete steps to track the truth. They’re trying to warn you and help you see. Instead of snarky insults, you should thank them, as their intentions are to warn you. Ease up and at least respect that much.

    Reply

  • Lisa

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    Marie, I do sincerely thank the people who helped and didn’t treat me like I was an idiot in their responses, however, I will definely utilize the good advice that I have received in these responses. One more question, though, what I don’t understand is all of the time that all you spend on this site. I mean it makes sense why people like me look into this site to try to get a better idea about MK, however I expected to see in this site more of past blog posts and not so much live interaction. If MK scorned you,. why are you still so invested in it? I understand wanting to help people like me who are new consultants but, again there is so much bitterness that I actually feel sorry for you guys. I guess when all is said and done with my Mary Kay business, I hope that when I do say good bye to it that I truly say good bye and not let it define me!
    Best Wishes,

    Lisa

    Reply

    • Marie

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      Lisa you’ve hit on the KEY reason you should consider the time people spend on here as your gigantic RED FLAG. The depth of deceit and fraud and loss that they endured is in DIRECT proportion to the energy they expend here. And it’s not a “handful of lazy losers” or just “negativity”. It’s thousands of people from all over, who don’t know each other, saying the same thing. At some point, the cognitive dissonance that you have to willfully employ to override your sinking feeling (that they might be right), will be huge. Amazingly and sadly, some people have an enormous capacity for it. Just look at any victim of any intricate swindle and they can identify the moment where they overrode that inner voice that said “This isn’t right”. It’s your loss if you do, but you can’t say the people here didn’t warn you.

      Reply

    • TRACY

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      Lisa – No one treated you like an idiot. You asked for advice and you got the straight story. I’m sorry if people interact too much for your taste. Something tells me that if the site was focused on “past blog posts and not so much live interaction”, then you’d be complaining that no one answered your questions.

      Let’s face it: You didn’t really want any help. You just wanted to either have your bias confirmed, or stir the pot, or both. Thanks for stopping by and good luck… no further comments from you will be published.

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  • exibc78

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    We are on here to provide comments that would be helpful and to answer questions. Also I do very much enjoy reading the comments from the truly fogged as well as the members comments back. Also on the discussion board, as I was going through the absolutely roughest time in my life these ladies were there for me. Supporting and making me laugh. Also I still read evety article because I am still somewhat in disbelief.
    I hope this answers you question…if we were not on here, like some websites, confused consultants questions would go unanswered.

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  • MLM Radar

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    The reason I stay is because of all the people around me who get burned by multi-level marketing companies. As long as these scams keep going, someone has to keep fighting back.

    For me it began when I was a kid and was exposed to chain letters and “gifting” ponzi schemes. Send a dollar to the five people on the list above you, rewrite the list with your name at the bottom, mail the letter to 20 friends, and when you’re at the top of the pyramid hundreds of dollars will come your way. It didn’t make sense then, but obviously the friend who sent it to me thought it did. No one had stopped to do the math. And so my battle against these frauds began.

    When I grew up the chain letters became product retailing and recruiting schemes. Same method, but somehow legitimized because products were bought and sold. Hotel conference rooms were packed with people dreaming the dream, and I was dragged along by friends seeking opportunities. The numbers and pyramid setup still guaranteed failure for everyone in the room except the guy standing in front with the microphone.

    I watched the promoters brag and wave around huge rolls of cash. I heard the pitches for overpriced products and “magic” potions. I watched the gullible line up to eagerly buy in. And I watched my friends become believers because I didn’t know how to debunk the promoters’ claims.

    Some of my friends swore they were only in the business to sell products. They believed the claims – quit your job, get rich, the products sell themselves, people love to shop at home with a personal consultant, people will practically trip over themselves giving you referrals. And I watched my friends fail.

    It was all lies. Few people wanted to buy the products. Even fewer wanted to give my friends new leads. The marketing materials which cost so much were never unwrapped because no one would agree to listen to a sales presentation.

    I watched my friends’ self-esteem collapse. They were convinced the reason they failed was that they had done something wrong. They were convinced they didn’t try hard enough. They still believed the system worked, if only, if only… They cold-called. They stalked bars and coffeeshops. They bought mailing lists and bulk mail permits. They abused church and social club directories. Their email accounts were suspended for spamming. They bought “how to” books which they memorized, and audio programs which they listened to non-stop.

    We win this war one person at a time. These companies stay in business because there is a never-ending supply of people, old enough to know better, who have never investigated these companies. There is a never-ending supply of young folk eager to be independent who don’t even know what questions they should ask. Yet everyone seems to know someone who says he or she got rich in a network marketing company. Few realize those claims are mostly lies. “Fake it till you make it” really means “Never quit faking it.”

    This website is one way I can reach one person at a time and hopefully save them from the never-ending predatory companies. I’m not here from bitterness. I’m here because I’ve seen the pain, felt the pain, and helped my friends free themselves from the pain.

    Years ago I didn’t even know what questions to ask, or whom to ask. Now I know both the questions and the answers. If I can use that knowledge to help one more person tomorrow, I will do it.

    Reply

  • Tigger

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    Note to all current K-Bots who come in here to snipe -

    You don’t know anything about us except what we choose to reveal. Our experiences belong to us and were very personal.

    We’ll get ‘over it’ when we damned well feel like it, savvy?

    Reply

  • princess lea

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    The amount of time we spend on this website in no way what so ever compares to the time we spent beating dead horses with our mary kay businesses…
    Just my two cents. LOL! :)

    Reply

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