Why Would a Top Director Quit?

This is the story of a former top director in Mary Kay who was nearing NSD status. See why she gave it all up.

I was in Mary Kay for 12 years and  a top director for 10 of those 12 years.  We finished $450,000 unit club our first year as a unit and never did less. Our highest year was almost $900,000. Always in a Pink Cadillac, never missed production, never made a car payment. We recruited about 20 a month to have the numbers.

I did debuts for all new consultants and sold on average of about $600 and booked their Power Starts at the debut plus recruited at least 1 or 2 at the debuts. I worked REALLY, REALLY hard. I was careful to work my business ethically and enjoyed the 6 figure income.   

So why did I quit?????

About 2 years before I quit, I started to look at my life and felt conflicted over the time  and energy I was giving to my business… I started to realize that MK had become my whole life.  I thought about it on vacation, in church, in bed etc.  I thought about the next recruit, the debuts, the guest events.  The month always consisted of having so much in and so many in by the 15th to wrap up $25,000 to $30,000 by month end. Month after month, year after year. I guess you can say I got burned out.  I got tired of looking at everyone as a prospect or a business opportunity.

My best friend and I always talked about our business and worked together for years.  We were always careful not to be negative to each other.  Then one day we both were finding ourselves in the same place at the same time…. Our units were doing great, we only had a little to go to finish National areas, but we just couldn’t do it.

I met with my pastor and sought Godly advice.  He told me that God was simply re-directing me and that was okay.

The transition was hard, but as MK has always taught us that the pain of regret is harder than the pain of change.  I didn’t want to look back on my life and regret not being there for my family.

I thank the Lord for re-directing me when he did, and not 20 years later.  I quickly started a new career and began enjoying life without MK.  I feel like everyone on Pink Truth is a friend and I just wanted to finally say hello and God bless Tracy for having the courage to do this.

9 Comments

  1. BestDecision

    …because, until we left, we were on a never-ending hamster wheel.

    I love that the point was made that it is possible to get high amounts of production in, but it comes at a cost. I, too, did all of my new unit members’ business debuts, and it drained me to always be on and available to so many so often. My weekends or nights were never free for family or friends.

    Any glance at Leadership photos will show how many Directors have been trying for NSD for DECADES and still aren’t there. How long would one stay with any other company where they chased a promotion for that long fruitlessly?

    1. Lazy Gardens

      How long would one stay with any other company where they chased a promotion for that long fruitlessly?

      In real business, in that evil “Corporate America” you can often make a sideways step to another company and get the promotion. Not so in MLMs.

  2. Formykids

    My ex wife’s national has been one for 14 years and has one low level NSD offspring. One in 14 years. She has 38 SDs under her, most of which believe they will make National, and not one of them is even half way there. Btw, that number, 38, has not changed in years. Some come and some go, but it always seems to stay right around 38. Someone please explain how it is even remotely possible for any of these 38 to get to NSD.

    1. TRACY

      It’s not. There are about 13,000 sales directors in the U.S. There are about 225 NSDs in the U.S. Do the math. About 1 NSD for every 58 sales directors. But that’s only for the sales directors who are currently in. There are a whole bunch of sales directors who have crashed and burned under these NSDs. Dare I say these NSDs probably turn over their downline every 5 to 7 years or so? I don’t have any hard facts to back that up. They have a handful of sales directors who stick around for the long haul, but the rest are on a constant churn.

  3. Formykids

    I don’t have any hard data either other than my ex wife’s area, where you are exactly right, Tracy, there are about 10-12 SDs that have been around for years, and the other 27-29 come and go.

  4. raisinberry

    If the Sd has consultants who love the product, former offspring, former Unit members all drop away but become her customers again, so a SD who’s been in for 25 -30 years has the benefit of scooping up everybody else’s customers to run her reorder business…this puts her in a unique position that no one else has unless they too are a long time SD. Only how will that EVER be the reorder situation for a new recruit? Not a chance. Like any other MLM, if you got in early you reap the benefit of all the churn and burn that happens after. The bottom always falls out and the SD finds the new cream that rises to the top, till it burns out, and round and round we go…any loose MK product lovers will become her reorders. It’s a system that rewards women who do not care how much debt and wreckage they foster in other people’s lives.

  5. MLM Radar

    We finished $450,000 unit club our first year as a unit and never did less. Our highest year was almost $900,000. I did debuts for all new consultants and sold on average of about $600 and booked their Power Starts at the debut plus recruited at least 1 or 2 at the debuts. I worked REALLY, REALLY hard. I was careful to work my business ethically and enjoyed the 6 figure income.

    First of all, I’m really glad she got off the recruit-and-frontload hamster wheel. And I’m really, really glad she saw the light before pushing up to the NSD level.

    But can someone please explain how it is ethical to “work your business” by saddling women with half-a-million +++ a year in debt, while hamstringing their “businesses” by recruiting their best customers at their debuts? And to keep doing that for 12 years?

    I just don’t get it.

    I’m sure she thought of herself as a nice person. I’m sure she still thinks that. But what she did… for 12 years… was simply NOT ethical.

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