Husbands Are In On the Mary Kay Lies

The lies in Mary Kay are not restricted to consultants, directors, and national sales directors. The husbands regularly get in on the action, trying to add an air of legitimacy to the “business.” Sure… if the husband says it’s legit, then it must be! The following untruths come from a letter signed by the husband of a Mary Kay nsd:

  • I have never run across a business opportunity such as this where someone can work part-time or full-time, depending on their own wishes, name their own hours so they can be home with children if they desire, spending $100.00 minimum to get into the business and have a 90% guarantee buy-back on all products they purchase thorugh Mary Kay, if returned within the first year of becoming a consultant.
  • Customers buy their products directly from their Consultants and Directors. Mary Kay, Inc. has 10% of the skin care market. Therefore, any thoughts of saturation in your city or state is unfounded.
  • This inventory is a necessary investment in building a profitable business. If a sufficient amount of inventory isn’t purchased it is like a golfer who has a set of irons but no woods.

Now I think we can all agree that the nsd supplied the substance of this letter. Surely an NSD knows that the rule isn’t “within the first year of becoming a consultant,” rather inventory can be returned for a full year after it is ordered, no matter when the consultant orders it.

And for the saturation and “necessary investment” statements… Well, I think we all know how untrue both of those are.

29 Comments

  1. raisinberry

    This topic could really be developed further. It is true that using the NSD hubby’s to influence new targets was a thing. Their testimony added greater legitimacy to the “opportunity” and also quieted the doubts of the husbands that went to Seminar, as they were usually sequestered away to be brain washed.

    In our area, one of the NSD hubby’s was quoted as saying, (to the others) “Just load her trunk and stay out of her way cause she’ll make alot of money for ya.”

    Very subtle admonition to not be too nose-y about her business dealings, providing cover for her to over order needed production.

  2. Lazy Gardens

    “This inventory is a necessary investment in building a profitable business. If a sufficient amount of inventory isn’t purchased it is like a golfer who has a set of irons but no woods.”

    If TOO MUCH inventory is purchased, it’s like concrete overshoes on your finances. If TOO LITTLE inventory is on hand, or too little of the right stuff, you lose sales and waste money special ordering. Every company I ever worked for was extremely vigilant about keeping the inventory as low as possible without running out of critical things.

    However, that’s a problem with a solution. And formulas. And people with PhDs in business figuring it out.

    https://opexsociety.org/body-of-knowledge/5-keys-to-establishing-and-maintaining-optimal-target-inventory-levels-for-each-item-in-each-location/

    https://www.lokad.com/calculate-safety-stocks-with-sales-forecasting

    http://www.nbds.com/articles/Optimum-Inventory-levels.html

      1. enorth

        “Oh, I’m sure it was written by the NSD.”

        LOL. Like the letter supposedly written by a consultant to her upline, saying she deeply regretted quitting Mary Kay, she had made a huge mistake, let this be a warning to others so they don’t make the same mistake, blah blah blah.

  3. coralrose

    “MK has 10% of the skin care market. Therefore, thoughts of saturation are unfounded” Riiiiight. That’d be funny if it wasn’t so destructive.
    So, 10% of the market divided by how many consultants?? And more are recruited every day. That’s a tiny piece of the pie for those consultants.

  4. cbbgreat

    Mary Kay, Inc. has 10% of the skin care market

    really? show me the market research, the report, the proof. Oh wait, like those Schedule Cs that have never been produced and the nonsense about more women earning 100k/year in MK than anywhere else.

    Made up.

  5. klange48

    Sheesh, show me on the doll where MK hurt you. The writers of these articles, especially this “What to expect for new Mary Kay consultants” letter, all sound salty as hell about the company. I’ve been a successful consultant (now director) for about 2 years and yes, I’m one of the lucky ones who have a lucrative clientele that consists of family, friends and strong community ties that buy from me regularly as well as a few friend of friends who I was able to recruit and make up my amazing team. But I tell you, it makes great money for my new husband and I. If you know how to market the products and have people who are willing to buy it, then it makes you a good living. I understand this is a luck of the draw thing, but stop making it out to be some evil pyramid scheme. If you’re unsuccessful at it, you’re not trying hard enough. Stop trying to discourage other excited consultants, just because it didn’t work out for you.

    1. TRACY

      Sadly, it’s not about knowing how to market or any of the normal things you do with a business, because it’s not a real business. It’s a pyramid scheme, plain and simple, and nearly everyone loses money because it’s a pyramid scheme. It sounds great to say that 99% of people in MLM lose money because they’re not trying hard enough, but the facts don’t support that.

    2. BestDecision

      What car are you driving? If you’re not in a Cadillac (as I was, so obviously I tried “hard enough”), you’re grossing less than $48K/year. There’s lots of careers out here paying better than the coveted top 2% of MK.

      And those $70 sheet masks aren’t going to back your “lucrative” adjective to describe sales.

      But, I’m begging you don’t really track your expenses, nor do you really know what your net profit was last year. Or, are you like MANY I’ve heard at Leadership say they don’t report their taxes?

    3. BestDecision

      It’s pathetic you used an analogy of a molested child pointing out on a doll where he was to describe anyone’s time in MK. No matter what you say now, I’m not going to take you sriously or value what you say. Just awful.

    4. Lazy Gardens

      “it makes great money for my new husband and I.”

      Please send your Schedule C for the Maty Kay years to Tracy ([email protected]) to confirm this statement. She’s the site owner and an accountant.

      Because often people confuse “high cash flow” for “great income”.

    5. Siobhan Eith

      I agree, I am a new consultant as of December. My sales director and team are very supportive and I am not making a buttload of money, but I am doing fine and know if I apply myself and time just a bit more, I will be even more successful. I am a teacher and will have even more time to commit this summer! I am still excited and motivated about Mary Kay and I have two new friends on this team who have only been doing it for about six months and are already making a decent profit and succeeding! The market is not saturated!

      1. TRACY

        Sigh. Another teacher who got sucked in with the idea of making money over summer. How do you know your friends are profiting? Have they shared all of their income and expenses with you?

        99% of people lose money in MLM, so your friends are likely losing money, but they told you they’re making money because they wanted you to sign up as a consultant. Do you think they’d tell you if they were losing money? Of course not! You wouldn’t sign up then!

        So you’ve been a consultant for 2 months. You’ve sold to the friends and family who are willing to make pity purchases. Who do you sell to next? Where do you get new customers? It gets really hard really fast.

        1. Siobhan Eith

          I have already had parties with new people I don’t know and booked parties off of those parties, all new people to me, looking forward to this summer….I am not looking to “get rich” or even earn the car, I am looking for a little extra money each month and the time I put in is fun, not grudging work.

          1. pinkvictim

            1) If you are going to give it a go, please be sure to keep a spread sheet with ALL of your sales and expenses. ALL of your expenses – gas, phone bill, car maintenance, samples, packaging, labels, tags, tissue, cellophane, shrink wrap, coffee, lunches, taxes… EVERYTHING.

            2) Keep track of ALL the hours you work – not just 2 hours at a party. Time you spent calling and recalling the hostess and the guests, preparing for the party, driving to the party, setting up at the party, cleaning up after the party, driving home from the party. All the time spent unpacking the MK orders, labeling everything

            At the end of the month, divide number 1 (if it is more than $0) by number 2 – that’s how much you earn per hour.

            Come back and let us know how it’s going.

  6. enorth

    “a lucrative clientele that consists of family, friends and strong community ties.”

    Personally, I would never want a business built on selling to my family and friends. They are, after all, my family and friends.

  7. Cindylu

    A local NSD and her husband often promoted the fake pink story. He also sold motivational tapes etc which I’m sure they both profited from. How many women were conned into joining this mlm by the misleading words of these two. Since she joined MK in the early eighties, the market for her area was wide open. Still it took her a while to make it. I can’t imagine any consultants or directors making executive income anymore. Especially when the market is now saturated and when the pieces of the pie gets continuously smaller. (For quite some time now, word is out that this is an mlm and there have been hundreds of women who have been hurt financially and otherwise for decades now.)

  8. onelessSD

    klange48…. still waiting on that dreaded Schedule C.. ..the one that itemizes every single expense against your sales, commissions, etc…. and shows us the bottom line.

    Seriously, I wish I would have paid more attention to that bottom line when I was in. Just like MK always says… Numbers don’t lie…. so let yours speak the truth and prove it… otherwise you’re just a bunch of hot air spewing.

  9. Princess Lea

    Well I had my husband fooled. He believed in me, but was skeptical of Mary Kay. And rightfully so. He saw the flow of money and mistook it for income. Sadly it wasn’t income at all. After ten long years of “profiting” off my friends and family, and making fake friends out of strangers for the sole purpose of a pink car, I finally looked at my schedule C. The numbers don’t lie and I had lost $20,000. And Mark Kay lost me. But we’re all easily replaced in pyramid schemes…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *