Another Mary Kay Sales Director in Denial

One of our members responded to an email sent by her sales director, including her entire unit in the communication so they could see why she was quitting Mary Kay. This is the sales director’s response, complete with many Mary Kay-isms and fogged thinking.

I am saddened to know that you feel your experience in Mary Kay was not a positive one.  My experience has shown me that most who have complaints are people who choose not to work their business.  They do not show up for educational opportunities or put forth the effort it requires to run their own business.  Being an entrepreneur is not for everyone.  It requires discipline, pro-active work, problem solving skills, a positive attitude, and a willingness to generate business by talking to people about our products.  This business is not for everyone, and that is truly ok!

Consultants come in for a reason, a season, or a lifetime.  It is not a guarantee that you will like everyone that you meet or everything that you try…I’m sure that you have acquaintances or even family members that you don’t like and activities that aren’t for you.  But I choose to offer the same support and opportunities to all of my consultants whether they work this business or not.   When I have a consultant who chooses not to continue this business for any reason, I don’t shut my door or my heart to them.

My 9 1/2 years of experience with Mary Kay have been completely wonderful.  I have built fulfilling long-lasting friendships with wonderful women both in the company and out.  These are women who pride themselves on having integrity in both their business dealings and personal relationships.  My job as an independent beauty consultant and sales director is honorable, and I am proud of my business and my company!

Our corporate staff exude those same traits and pride themselves on running a company that “thinks out of the box” (as you rarely find from corporate America) commanding integrity in business.  In addition, our corporate headquarters does not tolerate independent consultants that do not run their businesses with those same principles.  The company has in the past terminated the agreements of consultants who were not ethical in their business practices.  These were women on various levels of the career path who were warned one or more times to stop unethical practices.  Mary Kay Inc. has chosen to take the “high road”,  not the “easy road” which differs from some companies in Corporate America where the only thing that matters is the bottom line, not the integrity of their employees.

As for some discrepencies in your assumptions:

First, Mary Kay is not a multi-level/pyramid company.  The two main differences are as follows:

1.  Everyone makes 50% commission on their sales (from a brand new consultant to a National Sales Director)

2. Team Building commissions are paid based on how well personal teams and units work their businesses, not on how many people you have in your organization.  Our leadership skills help determine, but do not guarantee, how well the consultants/directors do.  We do not receive part of the consultants’ sales commission as in other companies.

Second, the woman who created and maintains the negative website you referred to is paid by advertisers and wants to generate as many hits as possible.  I have read some of the postings on that site and have found gross inaccuracies.  In addition, not ONE of the thousands of positive comments about Mary Kay are EVER posted on that site.  Pink Un-Factual Propaganda would be a better name for the site.  I am sure you could find a negative site for every major company or product you could name…Cadillac, Macy’s, even Purina Dog Chow.  That doesn’t make those sites factual.

Third, women who end up with debt after ending their Mary Kay business do so for two reasons:  One, they did not work their business.  Two, they embezzled from their business.  As you can see, having a corporate sponsered “buy-back guarantee” eliminates that issue.

I am sorry you are so disgruntled and would have been happy to have discussed this with you had you contacted me.  I have taken you off my email listing and would have done so sooner had my reports reflected you had returned your product.  In the future, I would appreciate that you do not send emails to the consultants in my unit since my distrobution list is not for public use.  I have already heard from some that do not appreciate or agree with your email and do not not want to receive further correspondence from you. I’m sure you appreciate that they respect your privacy as well.  You are welcome to contact me personally if needed.

I do wish you and your family the very best for the future.  I am sure that you are enjoying your son and life as a new mom.

17 Comments

  1. MLM Radar

    “They embezzled from their business.” Is that lie still going around?

    Look up the definition of embezzle. It means someone ELSE trusted you with money and whatever, and you stole it.

    You can not embezzle from yourself. That’s called “the owner made a decisions to spend his or her own money somewhere else.”

    Is your Mary Kay “business” an outside person who trusted you with the sale proceeds? Did your Mary Kay business buy the inventory and trust you to store it safely?

    No and no. In fact, you loaned money (your personal credit card, your savings account) to your Mary Kay “business” to get it started. Has your Mary Kay business” paid off that loan you made to it?

    Who is responsible for paying that credit card if your Mary Kay business can’t get the cash? That’s right. You are.

    It’s your money. It always was. You can’t embezzle from yourself.

    1. Deflated Pink Bubble

      THANK YOU! My SD pulled the “embezzled” line on me. I argued that point with her for hours. She couldn’t understand how her embezzlement concept didn’t make sense. It made me crazy.

      1. MLM Radar

        Your SD’s very narrow (and wrong) definition of embezzle is that you keep taking money out of your Mary Kay “business” for other purposes… such as spending it on the sort of things you intended your “business” profits to fund when you joined Mary Kay. What she wants you to do is to keep putting your profits… sales proceeds… any cash you get… back into the “business” for more inventory purchases (preferably), more events, more costs of recruiting… That way she makes a commission. What you want doesn’t matter.

        You signed up for this “business” so you could have an extra $$$ in spending money each month. But when you actually use the money the way you had always planned, out comes the Mary Kay dictionary with the redefined words to confuse you. “Selling” = 2x what you bought. “Sharing” = recruiting your customers so the SD makes a profit. “Embezzling” = using your MK sales proceeds to pay for non-MK things, like shoes for your kid and credit card payments, and IRS self-employment tax.

        Quite simply, the truth is that until your Mary Kay “business” has repaid you for all the startup costs you put into it, your “business” owes you money. As the owner and lender, you’re not embezzling. You’re collecting payments on that loan. And once that loan is paid off (AS IF!) you’re still not embezzling. You’re exercising your right as the business owner to withdraw the profits from your own business.

        Accusing you of embezzling is a classic abuse tactic called gaslighting. If you don’t know the term look it up on Wikipedia. It’s quite an interesting read.

  2. pinkpeace

    “My experience has shown me that most who have complaints are people who choose not to work their business. They do not show up for educational opportunities or put forth the effort it requires to run their own business. Being an entrepreneur is not for everyone. It requires discipline, pro-active work, problem solving skills, a positive attitude, and a willingness to generate business by talking to people about our products.”

    I am so tired of this line of crap. I was a director for 10 years, and I worked damn hard. I went to every corporate event and meeting – in fact, I was a trainer at many of them. I was always out warm chattering and working for bookings. And I put myself out for my unit members so that they could achieve success.

    My agony was that I WAS doing everything I was supposed to do, and I was still falling further and further into debt. Until I found Pink Truth, I truly thought I was the only sales director in that situation.

    And, as always, Schedule C please. The OP has no credibility without proof of earnings in MK.

    1. ThinkPinkThinkAgain

      The SD who wrote this letter says all the same things my director has for my five years as a consultant, and all the things I parroted and believed. And there is definitely truth to the idea that consultants who do not work do not see earnings. But your point, pinkpeace, is exactly on point: that consultants and directors who DO work–who work hard, who sacrifice time and money and emotional bandwidth–also profit very little, if at all.

      It’s entirely possible for a consultant to earn money selling Mary Kay, even if she doesn’t recruit many people. But it’s unlikely the majority, or even a significant fraction, of that money will EVER make its way out of her “business” and back into her personal life.

      For example, I worked my butt off earning money to pay the balance on my wedding ring (and my husband’s) a few years ago. It took a lot of time, and also so many discounts, to tempt my clients to buy right when I needed them to (which discouraged them from buying at full price in the future, and of course made it necessary for me to work harder and contact MORE people since I was selling below retail). In retrospect I also wonder how many Facebook friends stopped following me as a result of my constant updates about this project. So, did I earn the money for the rings? Yes. I was so proud! Mary Kay was working!

      But…I also went to Seminar that year, and I paid for my plane tickets from my PERSONAL bank account. There just wasn’t enough money in my MK account, you see, because I’d just paid for PCP and bought lots of foundations to replace newly expired ones in my inventory. While in Dallas, I stopped at the vendor booths and bought supplies with my PERSONAL money. A few months later, I had to settle up with my postage supplier and pay about $100 toward postage costs (why I ever started offering free shipping to my customers is beyond me). Did that money come from my MK checking account? No, I had to borrow it from my husband (and couldn’t pay it back until I got a bonus from my real job months and months later).

      Poor money management? No effort put into my business? Maybe I didn’t need those supplies, even though every MK order is supposed to be nicely wrapped. Maybe I didn’t need to go to Seminar (sacrilege!). Maybe I should have stopped offering free shipping for orders $50+ (it used to be $25 but I couldn’t sustain it). Maybe if I’d just held “one extra skincare class on top of what I was already doing” every week for the year prior, I could have had “enough money to pay for Seminar and then some.” Never mind that I was already spending two nights a week away from my new husband. Never mind that I was shoving profit from reorders back into more inventory because brand new products had just come out, and I couldn’t NOT buy them.

      I did my taxes this spring and WOKE UP. For some reason, looking at the numbers with my new husband was different from looking at them with my dad. I saw, more clearly than ever before, how little income my business was generating after expenses. “It really IS a hobby,” I thought to myself, horrified. “I didn’t make any money at all last year–in fact, I lost money!” Why was I giving up 5-10 hours after work and on weekends for a “business” that didn’t provide what it said it would–money toward my life? Our lives? Our home?

      The Mary Kay line is that I wasn’t working enough.

      My response, five years in? I’ve already worked too much.

  3. BestDecision

    Ha! Her “fulfilling long-lasting friendships” are a mirage. Wait until she leaves. The true test of a healthy relationship is how close they are standing to you when times are tough. It takes guts to still be friends with someone after they leave because we were all told to avoid them!

  4. Shay

    “Second, the woman who created and maintains the negative website you referred to is paid by advertisers and wants to generate as many hits as possible.“

    News Flash:
    Tracy places ads on her website here to help cover the cost of the hosting. Tracy isn’t sponsored by anyone. Hell, I think Tracy should rent ad space she would make more money than what the ads pay which isn’t much. Tracy also has her own business as a forensic accountant.

    As far as “hits” you’re damn right. Tracy wants everyone to know the Pink Truth.

      1. ran4fun

        I just drove by a Walgreen’s with a sign that said, “Hiring estheticians and makeup artists”. I’ve also seen TV commercials, too.

        MK people would not even qualify for those jobs.

  5. Shay

    I had a website that had a higher Alexa rank than this website. Of course Alexa rank isn’t accurate, but I mention it bevsusd I had a website with Google Ads, Advertise, Info links etc. let me tell you- I obviously don’t have the website anymore (sold it) because the ad revenue sucked. It’s hard work running a website.
    It cracks me up that people think Tracy is making a living by running this website. *Laughs*
    No. *straight face*
    Seriously ignorance is bliss.

    1. TRACY

      The ads used to cover the hosting cost (which is high due to traffic levels). They don’t even do that anymore because so many people are using ad blockers. Not saying that to complain, because I don’t mind the cost. It’s just that this is hardly a money maker!

  6. Pinkiu

    Don’t you love the dismissive attitude?
    “My experience has shown me that most who have complaints are people who choose not to work their business. They do not show up for educational opportunities or put forth the effort it requires to run their own business. Being an entrepreneur is not for everyone. It requires discipline, pro-active work, problem solving skills, a positive attitude, and a willingness to generate business by talking to people about our products.”

    Interpretation: “I am really talking about you, you lazy loser! How dare you burst my bubble with facts! In retaliation, I’m going to be passive aggressive and tell you how mad I am that you are getting off of this hamster wheel and getting your life back while I have to put on a fake smile.”

  7. No longer a pawn

    WOW! The tone of this note from this SD was a roller coaster ride. First – let me “school” you on why you failed. Second – how dare you return product and create a charge back for wonderful me, me, me. Third – Do not poison my remaining pool with the facts by introducing them to “that” website. And finally – I have a load of friends, and you don’t.

    Send in the FBI for that embezzlement claim. That line always makes me just giggle.

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