Is Mary Kay a Real Job?

This is Mary Kay NSD Gloria Mayfield Banks comparing Mary Kay to a “real job.” Mary Kay isn’t a real job because 99% of the people involved spend money on it instead of getting a paycheck. Because it’s an MLM, the odds of success for the vast majority are miniscule. So they’ll end up spending money instead of making money.

Success in Mary Kay is not tied to mastering a skill or working hard. It is directly proportionate to whether or not you can “pull inventory.” If you can recruit new victims and get them to place big initial orders, you move up. But only if you can do that faster than people quit and return their inventory. And you need to churn the volume of recruits very fast.

So is Mary Kay a real job?

Throughout my career I have seen many Consultants come and go because they felt they needed to find a “Real Job.” Why do people think that Mary Kay is NOT a “Real” job? What classifies an opportunity as a “Real” job? Does getting a paycheck with the same number of dollars each pay period classify as a “Real” job? Does working 10-40+ hours, and still making the same amount of money classify?

How about getting up very early, taking a shower and leaving your house every day? What about putting your kids in daycare- does that make it a “Real” job? How about having to schedule vacation time a year in advance? Or having to explain to your supervisor why you need a day off? Maybe that is what makes it a “Real” job. Maybe you need to be working for someone else, have to report to someone else and let him or her decide when you deserve a raise.

Let’s pretend for a moment. What if we apply “Real” job guidelines to your Mary Kay business? Just imagine if you devote 20 hours per week of complete and total focus to doing your Mary Kay job well? What if you set your own goal and always did today’s work today instead of waiting until you felt like it? Imagine the possibilities- if you paid attention to profitability and actually took the steps necessary to promote yourself.

You owe it to yourself to make Mary Kay a “Real” job-even if it’s just part-time.

Why would you give more time and commitment to someone else’s business than you would your own? Do you really want to work for someone else forever?

Wouldn’t you prefer to work 20 hours, but get paid like you worked 40 hours?Would you like to be your own boss? Would you like to plan your own hours each week to work within your family’s schedule? What if you could take an extra day off one week, then work an extra two hours each day for the next week to make up for it? Do you have this type of freedom with your “Real” job?

If you feel like you have “tried Mary Kay” and it hasn’t worked for you, try asking yourself a few questions.

  • If someone with my MK work habits worked for me, would I continue to pay them or reward them?
  • Am I consistent in my efforts?
  • Do I make calls when I need to make them- no matter what?
  • Do I place orders in a timely manner to keep the “store” stocked with the hottest, most up-to-date products?
  • Do I give great customer service-going over and above what the client expects?
  • Do I follow up on all leads and potential recruits quickly and professionally?
  • Do I work with my Director on accountability and turn in my weekly accomplishment sheets?
  • Do I attend trainings and events in my area?

If you have answered any of these questions with a “NO”, perhaps this is an opportunity to change your ways and make new goals for your business this month. Make it a point to treat your Mary Kay business like a “Real” job-you will earn REAL money, REAL cars, REAL prizes and see REAL changes in your life!

Want to make a REAL difference in the lives of women? I believe we can!

With a Mary Kay Career, what you make is up to you!

18 Comments

    1. Mountaineer95

      As someone who once worked as an executive recruiter (management to C-level positions), I can tell you that I did see some resumes with MK histories on them and we always saw it as a negative. This was before I had ever seen PT.

      Kaybots, think about it this way if no other: MK is heavily marketed as a fantastic opportunity, totally advantageous over corporate jobs in every way, and with no limit to your success…so if you WERE in MK, and no longer are, obviously you can’t be very good at sales…because how else would you explain how you did not succeed at such an easy, fantastic, “promote yourself” career? That’s what having your past MK experience on your resume tells a prospective employer.

  1. Char

    Mad Libs style fun again. I could see a drug boss having this conversation with a low-level dealer in his territory (network). Read the paragraph below and see how it makes sense.

    So is [drug dealing] a real job?

    “Throughout my career I have seen many [dealers] come and go because they felt they needed to find a “Real Job.” Why do people think that [drug dealing] is NOT a “Real” job? What classifies an opportunity as a “Real” job? Does getting a paycheck with the same number of dollars each pay period classify as a “Real” job? Does working 10-40+ hours, and still making the same amount of money classify?……”

    Now insert pyramid scheming (MLM aka Mary Kay). What is pyramid scheming? Reiterating Tracy’s words:

    “Success in Mary Kay is not tied to mastering a skill or working hard. It is directly proportionate to whether or not you can “pull inventory.” If you can recruit new victims and get them to place big initial orders, you move up. But only if you can do that faster than people quit and return their inventory. And you need to churn the volume of recruits very fast.”

    Adding, you must lie about the opportunity in order to get victims to place that initial big purchase. The best liars are indeed the most successful pyramid schemers (MK consultants). Noting that, not all opportunities translate to ethical ones; and also noting it depends on what you’re “successful” at. I’ve heard of successful: bank robbers, cheaters, murderers, etc..

    Moral: It matters WHAT you are doing.

    Like drug dealing, pyramid scheming is very real in some people’s world; but it is not an “ethical job”. The “work” these people do hurts, or corrupts, others.

    The point of this post is to call attention to the way MLM manipulates our language to confuse the mark. They have hi-jacked many words to imply something positive when that word can have many meanings.

    Don’t let independent and very real con artists, like the incredibly successful pyramid schemer GMB, trip you up.

    1. Char

      Forgot to say a big congratulations to all those who failed at MLM (Mary Kay). You must be lousy liars! And to the reformed, mildly successful pyramid schemers now here, tons of respect for changing your ways.

  2. Wild Collards

    These MK folks seem to think they don’t have a “supervisor” over them. I may have to plan ahead for vacation time, but at least my supervisor isn’t guilting me into purchasing product I don’t need for her to make a goal.

  3. BestDecision

    I don’t have to schedule vacations “a year in advance”, but she doesn’t admit she schedules hers around Fall Retreats, Leadership Conferences, month-end, year, end, etc.

  4. Lazy Gardens

    “What if we apply “Real” job guidelines to your Mary Kay business?” If you applied REAL business practices to any MLM, you would QUIT immediately, because it would make it clear that it’s not a sustainable business:

    ” …. if you paid attention to profitability.” If you tracked expenses versus income, you would see that you are losing money and quit.

    “… actually took the steps necessary to promote yourself.” I have never had to recruit a bunch people to do what I do, and buy product they can’t sell to get a promotion in a REAL JOB.

  5. Mountaineer95

    “Why would you give more time and commitment to someone else’s business than you would your own?”

    …yet that’s what every director in MK is asking of her IBCs when she begs for production to help achieve her OWN goal (car level, etc) that does not benefit the IBC in any way (but instead sees the IBC stacking more and more unsold inventory in her basement).

    1. Lazy Gardens

      Especially to get the director’s butt into the seat of that “free car” that puts many women in debt for the benefit of the ONE, the ONLY, “Mary Kay Car Driver“.

      I would rather work on buying my own car.

      1. ThinkPinkThinkAgain

        Yes!I I happily put $2,000 of inventory on a credit card to help my director finish her first car. What a “miracle” that $13,000 production came in from our unit on that last day of June!

        I couldn’t pay that card off until two and a half years later when I got a bonus from my “real” job. According to my taxes, that single bonus provided more profit than my ENTIRE five years of Mary Kay consultancy…even when half of that bonus disappeared after taxes.

        I shudder to think how much debt my fellow consultants were and are in because of “helping their director finish car.”

  6. Lazy Gardens

    “Does getting a paycheck with the same number of dollars each pay period classify as a “Real” job?” Maybe not, but it certainly helps budgeting and bill paying. Having an unexpected few thousands taken from your “love check” because some downlines quit and returned inventory must hurt.

    1. MakeupLover

      Having a real job lets you take a sick day and GET PAID for it! Having a real job lets you take vacations and GET PAID for it! Having a real job lets you put money away in a 401k and the company GIVES YOU A MATCH! I got really sick last year and my company PAID ME short term disability! Unless you make it to the top tier of National Sales Director, Mary Kay offers no security whatsoever. I am very blessed to have my J-O-B.

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