Pink Truth Dimwits

This comment was left earlier this week on our article asking Mary Kay Inc. some questions. Apparently EVERYONE knows what a scam Mary Kay is, and they still sign up for it.

“So to whatever Mary Kay executive or minion is reading this right now, I’ll ask you straight out: how do you live with yourself?”

C’mon now, lay off the melodrama. You and everyone else who signed up for this obvious scam knew you were getting into. They probably live with themselves just like the politicians you vote for, the businesses who use child labor whose goods you buy, and so on: they all know what they do, but as long as people like you continue to buy into their schtick, they don’t care. Why should they? They’re getting paid, and a society is what it incentivizes: we incentivized greed and ignorance.

We live in the information age where the truth is freely avaliable within five seconds. We have tons of horror stories out there about MLMs in general, and yet you couldn’t be arsed to look for any of them?

I call BS.

Pink Truth is full of nothing but a bunch of dimwits who gladly bought into a scam out of hubris and greed, then whine about how they were the victims after all.

The only victims of any MLM are the spouses and children of those who buy into them.

Of course, I’ll be told I’m “victim blaming” or something. LOL. You lot sound like a drunk driver who kills a family of five on the road, then acts like he did nothing wrong because it was all a mistake, as if no one knew you’re not supposed to drive while drunk.

What a sick sad world we live in.

27 Comments

  1. raisinberry

    I get the point of this writer. Directors in particular really have alot of explaining to do. Especially once you start hearing about the “tricks of the trade”, and continue to press on under some delusion that YOUR unit will be different. YOU will set the bar higher.

    And then you don’t.

    But, gullibility isn’t a sin. And everyone who onboards with MK is told it is NOT a multi-level.
    They see a sales force in lock step with each other, making the same pronouncements…why would anyone disbelieve what they are being told? Every meeting is another positive propaganda session.

    The wake-up call should be the first time you see falsehood and fraud and pretend you haven’t. The first time someone is recognized for sales they have not made. (Wholesale ordering is not sales). The first time someone’s mom shows up as a recruit in the newsletter. The first time you are told another Top Director has maxxed credit cards. The first time you hear about an NSD wannabe stuffing Units with personell.
    These are the times when this poster might have a point. Denial and pretense is the machinery of Mary Kay.

  2. MLM Radar

    Sounds like a typical troll. Is he pushing an MLM of his own, or just gloating about his own superiority?

    OTOH, he could be a wounded husband of a Kaybot who came here to vent. If that’s the case, I hope he gives us his story when he cools off a bit.

    I’m glad he can see the obvious. Unfortunately, that’s not the case with many people. This is a website dedicated to helping people see the truth when it wasn’t so obvious to them.

    1. MLM Radar

      Notice how he says when it’s someone else’s story it’s a good horror story, but when it’s our own horror story he says it’s just melodrama from a bunch of dimwits?

      What I’ve found here are SOME horror stories, and a lot of other people who didn’t wind up with their own horror story because they found the Pink Truth and got out of the trap.

  3. shay

    We live in the information age where the truth is freely avaliable within five seconds. We have tons of horror stories out there about MLMs in general, and yet you couldn’t be arsed to look for any of them?

    You know what? A lot of women here when in MK didn’t have the information at their fingertips. Pink Truth was born then. But still, I am not going to shame someone for being lied too. Look at Michelle Cunningham, tells her possible recruits, “I’ll send you the information” then mumbles they will just find negative stuff.

  4. Not a Bot

    Many people’s story started a long time ago when this information wasn’t available on the web like it is today. Also many people were young when they started and didn’t have the life experience to know these types of ‘businesses’ don’t work or the people they thought sincerely wanted to help them were not as they seemed. People may have wanted to help out a friend who called asking for help with some MK scheme and not known what they were getting into. I understand the letter writers distaste for this scheme, but I believe most people wouldn’t purposely join a scam.

  5. Brainwashed no more

    Yes. And, a lot of people were recruited through family or friends. You wouldn’t think that they would lie to you. It’s using personal relationships to promote the scam. “Support me, I’m your friend… Help me meet my goal… Be part of a team.” Lots of lies. People who mean to support others. They mean well and want to help. Google wasn’t so available for research.

  6. Char

    I understand this guy’s sentiment with one caveat. You must first suspect it is a scam or falsehood to even be prompted to research it. With Mary Kay, some people don’t realize it’s MLM, or are told it is not. You must also understand that it is the MLM method that you should research, and not “the MLM” as in a particular company or product. That’s the smoke and mirrors of the scam called multi-level marketing.

    I can’t help but wonder if the author believes in a religion, and thus a hypocrite with his writing. Are we researching facts, or not? If he does subscribe to a particular religious “belief”, did he just grow up believing friends and family, or perhaps succumb to a recruiter or “outreach”? See how easy it is to fall victim.

    I think MLM believers should be a target of criticism, but congratulated when they figure it out. We all make mistakes.

    1. MLM Radar

      It seem you’re saying that someone who “believes” (why the quotes?) in a religion makes you more likely to fall for MLM scams.

      MK preaches a twisted gospel that looks like Christianity but is really just a fringe group’s tool for cult-like exploitation. Few mainstream religious leaders who took a close look at the MK scheme would approve.

      I speak from the perspective of being a CPA and Certified Fraud Examiner who has also closely investigated mainstream Christianity and found it to not be a fraud at all.

      You’re free to disagree, of course. I just ask that you not broadly dismiss all who follow a religion as gullible fools.

      1. Char

        Kindly do not put words in my mouth.

        It’s not right for him to presume people a dimwit for not researching facts, or accuse people of drinking cult kool-aid, IF he also drinks a version himself. That’s what I’m saying.

        “I speak from the perspective of being a CPA and Certified Fraud Examiner who has also closely investigated mainstream Christianity and found it to not be a fraud at all.” –

        Jewish and Muslim scholars disagree with you. Go figure. However, if you are talking about being a kind, loving, and accepting human like the man Jesus was, hopefully we all agree.

        “It seem you’re saying that someone who “believes” (why the quotes?) in a religion makes you more likely to fall for MLM scams.” –

        Belief in quotes because it is subjective and not objective. And yes I am, but why is that so offensive? If you have a propensity to ignore math and science, and focus on faith, hope, dreams, etc., I could see scammers trying to exploit that. Obviously not everyone can/will be duped by MLM, but it’s a good demographic to target. In fact, you’ll find most MLM companies do indeed have a religious undertone – just look at Mary Kay. Or, the fact that Utah, which is predominantly Mormon, is practically the MLM capital of the world.

        1. PeachyNotPink

          “It’s not right for him to presume people a dimwit for not researching facts, or accuse people of drinking cult kool-aid, IF he also drinks a version himself. That’s what I’m saying.”

          ” If you have a propensity to ignore math and science, and focus on faith, hope, dreams, etc., I could see scammers trying to exploit that.”

          Wow, that is some really generalized black and white thinking there, Char. Religion is a cult and anyone who believes has drunk the kool-aid? So one cannot believe in both religion and math/science at the same time? Having faith and hope and dreams automatically means you do not also believe in facts? That is truly an ignorant, narrow minded statement.

          People are complex. That is why they get taken in by scams. As we know these scammers also use personality profiles (DISC in MK) to suck you in. The MLM scammers understand that people are complex and they play on whatever personality trait will get you to agree – God first, executive salary, “free” stuff, recognition, etc.

          1. Char

            “Having faith and hope and dreams automatically means you do not also believe in facts? That is truly an ignorant, narrow minded statement.”

            No silly. Hopes and dreams are not facts at all; they are abstract thoughts. This needs to be told to MLM recruiters who will no doubt call me “ignorant and narrow minded”.

              1. PeachyNotPink

                Nevermind, I see that you meant this (hopes, dreams, etc.) to be aimed towards MLM recruiters. I do truly apologize for that part of my post and my snarky response above. I understand what you meant now. Again, mea culpa.

  7. MLM Radar

    Thank you for your reply. Please allow me to respond and then go. I have no desire to hijack this column and turn it into a religious debate.

    What troubles me is your broad brush comments that people who believe in God, under any name, are therefore more likely to believe human scam artists. Yes, I do find that offensive. Furthermore, I have good friends who are Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and Mormon, who agree with me.

    If I were to apply a similar broad brush I might say that atheists are close minded and judgmental, or that men typically make intolerant snap judgements, or that Republicans are uneducated rednecks and Democrats are communists.

    if you are an atheist or a man or a Republican or a Democrat, wouldn’t you find those broad brush statements offensive? I certainly hope you would.

    1. Char

      “What troubles me is your broad brush comments that people who believe in God, under any name, are therefore more likely to believe human scam artists.”

      Who said I know there isn’t a God? Certainly not me! I’m simply willing to admit I don’t have any proof either way, and I’m wary of any group or organization that claims they do. They don’t; no one does.

      It is firstly the scam artists themselves who believe religious people are more likely to fall for the MLM scam – which is why they use it! I’m making the connection.

  8. Neverpink

    I wanted to respond to the statements Char made, and bring it back to MK for a moment.

    I think I understand what Char was trying to say, but think those statements would offend, no matter how well or how poorly they were written.

    Char, you might be an atheist. I’m an atheist as well, and while I can see your thought process, I’d like you to consider this: MK is using religion as a means to an end. To MK, Christianity is the flavor that happens to work the best on their targets (in my opinion), so they stick with that doctrine. They are based in Texas, which, if I’m not mistaken, is a Bible Belt state. So it stands to reason that they’d use the religion of the majority in their area.

    (And by “works the best”, I mean that its use is a means to hook people through emotion or similarity or familiarity, etc. Not that a religious person is stupid or gullible. I hope that comes across!)

    If Texas was predominantly atheist, or if America was predominantly atheist, or Jewish, or Muslim, or whatever, I firmly believe MK would be slathered in whatever doctrine (or non-doctrine) was the majority/worked to entice the majority. I don’t think MK really cares what religion someone is or isn’t, they’re just using it as a means to hook people.

    I hope my thought process makes sense!

    1. PeachyNotPink

      MK uses the DISC profile to find your “button” and they continue to push it. When my recruiter was trying to hook me, she knew I wasn’t going to go for the “God first” aspect, nor was I going to be swayed by the “bling”, she hit me with “facts” (that turned out to be false or half truths). I was plied with data because that is what I respond to.

      While they are predominantly known for the mantra, “God first, family second, career third”. They will honestly tout whatever aspect has the most impact to you as a person. And that is what is truly evil about the manipulation in MK and all MLM’s.

      1. Neverpink

        Yes, that’s totally true and I forgot about the personality profiling. Thank you for bringing that up! How sick and twisted that they have such a system for finding your buttons and exploiting them through whatever means necessary.

  9. KeepinitReal

    I’m in Canada. I only signed up to get 50% off discount for my own personal purchases. Believing that I had the 50%off discount right away, and only had to make one order in the year for $450 retail, $225.00 my cost, to keep the 50%off discount. It was the way the Director worded it, and my misunderstanding of it. But now I know thats not the truth. My $98.00 only got me the starter set, and a consultant number, no 50% off. I wish Recruiters would be very clear from the start, instead of being misleading. As I felt I was lied to, which gave me a bad taste in my mouth about the Company Mary Kay.
    Then other things have not sat well with me. Director was very pushy about me buying retail. Even giving me a list of $5000.00 worth of inventory i should buy. “Ypu have to fake it, till you make it.”” Umm. Ya… Never!! Inventory is the biggest SCAM!! Better to invest in testers, and personal product for yourself. If a customer can try it, they are more likely to buy it. If you use it, easier to sell it. But Inventory is a waste of money, loosing its worth the longer it sits on shelf. Only good for 1, 2, or 3 years. Then its good for garbage.
    Paying for meetings. Then get a guilt trip, if you do not go to these weekly meetings. “You have to show up, to Go up!!” My Director always says. Then they teach out dated makeup applications. Tell you to recuite, but not how. Then compares you to other consultants who are doing better (one reason I don’t like females to begin with, to fake and catty). That doesn’t motivate me, just makes me not like other consultant as much, and respect my Director way less. Hmm.. no wonder I don’t want to pay to go to your meetings anymore.
    Everytime I run into Director or hear from her, she again says how important Inventory it. Thank goodness I know better. So many other reasons, i am not impressed with my Director, and her group of off springs.
    I prayed about Mary Kay, and God has shown me all these Anti MLM video’s, Mary Kay fails, books (Ask me about Mary Kay), websites (pink truth), On becoming a God in Central Florida (tv show), news shows (20- 20), etc.. Guess God is not happy With how these people are running Mary Kay as well.
    My morals are making it hard for me to sell MK, and recruit. Well I said I would give it a year. We will see how it goes by Summer 2020.
    I only joined to get 50% off. I never wanted the Ugly pink vehicle (especially not a leased one), never want to become a Director, had no intention on selling, or recruiting, or making this a fulltime business. So far, my Director, her offspring, has not made this a fun experience for Me. 🙁

    1. BestDecision

      Since you’re so passionate about how unethical they are, why not get out? I did! I couldn’t stand to associate with them any longer, and I didn’t want to give the brand one more penny. There’s way better products out there, and you don’t have to put yourself through so much to use quality products.

    2. MLM Radar

      You said you’d give it a year. Would you like to know why they manipulated you into agreeing to do that?

      They manipulated you into agreeing to a year because inventory can’t be returned after one year. That’s why.

      They know that a first order will almost always be the biggest order. They also get bonuses if they can get you to buy up. They pressure to place a big order right away, and to make a one year commitment so that they won’t have to repay their commissions and bonuses. That’s why.

      Your one year commitment has nothing to do with your desire to succeed. But it has everything to do with their wallets.

      The time to get out is as soon as you decide Mary Kay isn’t working for you. It seems you’ve already decided that, so the smart thing to do NOW is return any inventory you bought and (this is important) cancel your consultant number.

    1. Char

      That’s not the comparison. I believe they are making a case of “should’ve known better”, and then having that same person claiming it to be a mistake. This would apply to all levels of bad acts regardless of what the well-known bad act is. One should know better not to be an MLMer or a murderer.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *