Why a Top Director Quits

This is the story of a former top director in Mary Kay who was nearing NSD status. See why she gave it all up.

I was in Mary Kay for 12 years and a top director for 10 of those 12 years. We finished $450,000 unit club our first year as a unit and never did less. Our highest year was almost $900,000. Always in a Pink Cadillac, never missed production, never made a car payment. We recruited about 20 a month to have the numbers.

I did debuts for all new consultants and sold on average of about $600 and booked their Power Starts at the debut plus recruited at least 1 or 2 at the debuts. I worked REALLY, REALLY hard. I was careful to work my business ethically and enjoyed the 6 figure income.

So why did I quit?????

About 2 years before I quit, I started to look at my life and felt conflicted over the time and energy I was giving to my business… I started to realize that MK had become my whole life. I thought about it on vacation, in church, in bed etc. I thought about the next recruit, the debuts, the guest events. The month always consisted of having so much in and so many in by the 15th to wrap up $25,000 to $30,000 by month end. Month after month, year after year. I guess you can say I got burned out. I got tired of looking at everyone as a prospect or a business opportunity.

My best friend and I always talked about our business and worked together for years. We were always careful not to be negative to each other. Then one day we both were finding ourselves in the same place at the same time…. Our units were doing great, we only had a little to go to finish National areas, but we just couldn’t do it.

I met with my pastor and sought Godly advice. He told me that God was simply re-directing me and that was okay.

The transition was hard, but as MK has always taught us that the pain of regret is harder than the pain of change. I didn’t want to look back on my life and regret not being there for my family.

I thank the Lord for re-directing me when he did, and not 20 years later. I quickly started a new career and began enjoying life without MK. I feel like everyone on Pink Truth is a friend and I just wanted to finally say hello and God bless Tracy for having the courage to do this.

11 Comments

  1. BestDecision

    You’re never actually “off” in MK, and you can’t afford to be. Anyone who accuses us of lying isn’t being truthful themselves because we all know every month starts off at zero and can affect your quarter bonuses, recognition, and car status.

    Thank YOU for writing this post and showing how high-performing people burn out. I recall vacations that were timed around month-end or June 30, and those we were on always involved reading a self-help book and thoughts of what’s happening while I was gone.

    It just never, ever stops.

  2. Char

    I’m glad you’re here, and what I’m about to write is going to sound harsh to you right now. I understand, as you’re still in the justify phase and working through it. But, I just don’t want another prospect to say, “Oh that’s okay, as I’ll never burn out.” Point is, burn out is irrelevant unless, in principle, we also want to talk about drug dealers, hookers, and bank robbers and their burn out too.

    You were a top MLM scammer for 10 years. You convinced people to join a pyramid scheme and invest lots of money in it. You profited off of scamming other women by working really, really hard as a con artist. God didn’t redirect you because of “working” too hard at conning other women, he redirected you away from scamming them – if you want to believe something.

    Apologies again, as I realize you want to feel proud about your last 12 years and justify them. Be proud of your energy, but just not what you did with it. Be proud that you saw the light. Be proud that you’re out of the con game and willing to warn others.

    Also, it wasn’t your business, as being an MLMer is not a business. It’s Mary Kay Corps business. Their sales strategy is convincing women like you that you have a business so you’ll buy their overpriced product and recruit others for a little kickback. This strategy has allowed them to be a billion dollar company thanks to your orders and recruiting other people to do them same.

    1. eric

      Agreed. Its important to remember the underlying activity is flawed, the original sin so to speak, thus any pride in success within that construct needs to be expressed with awareness for the reality of MLM.

    2. NSDtonotbe

      I don’t think you realize what it takes to leave Mary Kay. It’s like an addict on drugs. You think this post was me focused because I relayed my accolades but you are mistaken. I relayed my accolades so new consultants and directors can see the “real” life of a top director. You have no business commenting on “my truth and story.” It was intended to free others. If one person reads my story and leaves Mary Kay the post has served its purpose. Your comments have served no purpose but to try to tear me down. If anything your comments might keep other top directors from speaking their truth and story.

      1. BestDecision

        Unlike some on here, you and I were Directors and know the truth of why we didn’t and did leave. Aren’t you glad you’re not already having to strategize Holiday Open Houses and shop for chintzy props to use in gift sets? Congrats to us!

      2. Char

        Denial. Anger. My post was not in the least intended to tear your down. I gave you credit where credit was due, especially referring to you as being victimized yourself. Perhaps that was too generous? Or, are you just used to being worshipped?

        You replied your intention is to “free others”, that’s great; and my intention is to not have them caged in the first place. I believe both perspectives serve a purpose, and I am going to comment if it helps stop victims from joining – which should be the ultimate goal.

        Your truth still refers to participants as “top directors”. While that may be what you were labelled, the reality is “top scammer”. But, I do understand we have to write “top Director” for search engines.

        Your opening paragraphs proclaimed what a “success” you were and says you did it ethically. Not possible if you were an MLMer. Recap:

        “I was in Mary Kay for 12 years and a top director for 10 of those 12 years. We finished $450,000 unit club our first year as a unit and never did less. Our highest year was almost $900,000. Always in a Pink Cadillac, never missed production, never made a car payment. We recruited about 20 a month to have the numbers.

        I did debuts for all new consultants and sold on average of about $600 and booked their Power Starts at the debut plus recruited at least 1 or 2 at the debuts. I worked REALLY, REALLY hard. I was careful to work my business ethically and enjoyed the 6 figure income.“

        Unlike some on here, that doesn’t impress me at all – unless I was an aspiring scammer. And even at that and in the ‘real’ world, being a Mary Kay upline is “big fish, small pond” kind of stuff. Your MLM “Director” attitude (lol), where people worshipped you, won’t intimidate many outside the pink bubble. Better get used to it.

        And to think, my original comment was an effort to be somewhat nice while also conveying the truth about what MLMers actually are. I simply didn’t want potential recruits to be misguided by your “accolades”. A potential new victim will simply think they won’t burn out like you, that you didn’t work your business right, etc..

        Who knew that achievements as a top scammer were considered accolades?

        1. TRACY

          Char – In fairness, your comment came off as harsh. I completely understand what you were trying to convey. I also completely understand where the author was coming from (reciting her #s so people know she wasn’t a lazy loser, etc). You both have really fair points here and I hate to see disagreements like this. 🙁

      3. Painful Truth

        When a drug addict is in recovery….we have our using stories. Your accolades add up to using stories ultimately, and it is very, very important to understand that. I was the premier drug addict – yay me. I wasn’t a drug dealer so I didn’t take anyone down by leading them into drugs. I didn’t win prizes or drive a special car, but I didn’t lead anyone into a life of swindling others either, but again, I was first in my class for ruining my life and breaking the hearts of those who love me. My criminality was just clearly more blatant. But I am not proud of anything I “achieved” in my using days, and yes, people need to understand the level you were at in mk, but they are not accolades.

  3. nomoremlm4me

    Thank you, OP, for writing. I am very glad you found another career after so long as an MLMer. Enjoy your actual time off, as there was none of that in MK. Did you convey to your SDs why you left and to encourage them to also get out?

  4. NayMKWay

    Perhaps in time, OP, you will get a better perspective and realize you weren’t just burnt out yourself, but burning through others as well. Always recruiting, but not growing? That’s not a business, that’s exploitation, always on the hunt for new victims. Like Char, I don’t want to sound harsh, but this article reads as awfully “me”-centric.

    We’re glad you’re here, OP, but most of us do not see your experience the same way your pastor did (who was no doubt unaware of the true nature of Mary Kay’s business practices). You needed to change your path all right, but it wasn’t all about you. 20 recruits per month for 12 years: that’s nearly 3,000 victims of Mary Kay’s fraud, which you were unwittingly helping to perpetuate. I’m sure they’d all appreciate an apology.

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